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Peter Cetera

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Peter Cetera - Peter Cetera [Full Moon Records FMH 3624] (September 1981)

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ITEM# SR-FUFMH3624
Ratings:C=G+; LP=VG-

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Artist:

Peter Cetera

Title:

Peter Cetera

Released: September 1981
Label: Full Moon Records
Catalog: FMH 3624
Pressing: Capitol Records Pressing Plant, Jacksonville
Genre: Rock
Note: Jacket has a notch cut-out


Matrix / Runout (Side A):
FMH1-3624-JW2 FORDEN STERLING 0

Matrix / Runout (Side B):
FMH2-3624-JW2 FORDEN STERLING 0
T R A C K L I S T:
01 Livin' In The Limelight
02 I Can Feel It
03 How Many Times
04 Holy Moly
05 Mona Mona
06 On The Line
07 Not Afraid To Cry
08 Evil Eye
09 Practical Man
10 Ivy Covered Walls
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Album Review

Rob Theakston [allmusic.com]

Having tasted success with Chicago throughout the '70s, Peter Cetera decided to launch his solo career at the dawn of the '80s with this ten-track exercise in rock. In an immediate departure from the successfully safe formula Chicago utilized to exhaustion, Cetera employed a stellar crew of guest artists to reinforce that this was his project. The Beach Boys' Carl Wilson and Ricky Fataar make guest appearances, as does Toto wunderkind Steve Lukather, to complement Cetera's distinctive voice and bass playing. They waste no time in getting going with the rocker ''Livin' in the Limelight,'' which features Lukather delivering a blazing guitar solo and Cetera trying to be as hard rocking as any soft rocker could possibly be. Think Don Johnson's ''Heartbeat'' and you're still nowhere close. Things simmer down a bit, and even return to Chicago-friendly territory, with ''Mona Mona'' and ''On the Line.'' But the mandate remains the same: to distinguish this record as a solo endeavor, even though many songs here would lay the blueprint and signal the direction Chicago would take with Chicago 16 and the chart-topping juggernaut Chicago 17. For anyone but die-hard Chicago/Cetera fans, this is nothing more than a passing fancy, and those looking for Cetera's safe and accessible ballads will be mildly disappointed. But fans of early-'80s rock will be pleasantly surprised if they approach this record with open ears.


Peter Cetera - Solitude / Solitaire [Warner Bros W1 25474] (1986)

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ITEM# SR-WAW125474
Ratings: C=VG+; LP=NM-

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Artist:

Peter Cetera

Title:

Solitude / Solitaire

Released: 1986
Label: Warner Bros
Catalog: W1 25474
Genre: Pop/Rock
NOTE: Manufactured by Columbia House under license
T R A C K L I S T:
01 Big Mistake 02 They Don't Make 'Em Like They Used To
03 Glory Of Love (Theme From The Karate Kid Part II)
04 Queen Of The Masquerade Ball
05 Daddy's Girl
06 The Next Time I Fall
07 Wake Up To Love
08 Solitude / Solitaire
09 Only Love Knows Why
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Album Review

Dan LeRoy [allmusic.com]

Chicago's early-'80s return from the scrapheap did more than bring the group its biggest chart successes: it finally shattered the carefully maintained "faceless" image that had prevented any member from becoming an individual star. In the dawning age of video, the band needed a focal point, and bassist Peter Cetera -- already the voice behind Chicago's soft rock smashes like "If You Leave Me Now," which had made significant inroads with the MOR audience -- was the logical choice. So it wasn't a huge surprise that, following Chicago XVII, Cetera decided to use his new celebrity to strike out on his own. He'd already come close to leaving a few years earlier, making his first solo album when Chicago was at a commercial low point; this time he had plenty of momentum, reinforced with a little cross-marketing for the movie The Karate Kid, Part II. Cetera's gallant "The Glory of Love" served as the film's theme and became a major hit as well as defined his post-Chicago sound -- essentially XVII without the horns, with one ultra-slick L.A. producer (Michael Omartian) replacing another (David Foster). The loss of brass, even in the subservient role it had come to play in post-resurrection Chicago, leaves Solitude/Solitaire bland around the edges, and since Omartian went for more trendy embellishments than Foster (especially on up-tempo tracks like "Big Mistake") the album doesn't have the timeless sound of Cetera's former work. However, his familiar tenor and gift for melody insure a pleasant listen even today, the well-crafted balladry making the lack of bite bearable.

Peter Cetera's Biography

Jason Ankeny [allmusic.com]

While best known as the longtime frontman for Chicago, singer Peter Cetera also enjoyed success as a solo performer. Born September 13, 1944 in the Windy City, Cetera was in a band called the Exceptions when in late 1967 he was recruited by another aspiring group, then called Chicago Transit Authority, to play bass. By the early '70s, Chicago was among the most popular acts in America, their brand of muscular jazz-rock spawning such major hits as "Does Anybody Really Know What Time It Is?" and "Saturday in the Park," many of them featuring Cetera on vocals. In 1976 he penned the gossamer ballad "If You Leave Me Now," and when it hit number one, most of Chicago's subsequent work followed in the same soft rock style. Although the band's fortunes dwindled over the remainder of the decade, in 1982 Chicago returned to the top of the charts with "Hard to Say I'm Sorry"; several more smashes, including "Hard Habit to Break" and "You're the Inspiration," were to follow.

Although Cetera recorded his eponymously titled solo debut in 1981, he remained with Chicago full-time until 1985. Upon quitting the band, he soon returned to the top of the charts with "The Glory of Love," the first single from his album Solitude/Solitaire as well as the theme to the film The Karate Kid, Part II; that same year he scored another number one smash, "The Next Time I Fall," a duet with Amy Grant. A year later he produced Agnetha Fältskog's I Stand Alone, and upon resurfacing in 1988 with One More Story, Cetera scored with another duet, "After All," this one recorded with Cher. After a four-year hiatus, he issued World Falling Down, his final release for Warner Bros. One Clear Voice was released in 1995, and in 1997 Cetera issued You're the Inspiration, a collection of past hits and new material. Cetera stepped out of the limelight for a few years to enjoy his life and his family, and returned in 2001 with Another Perfect World. The holiday offering You Just Gotta Love Christmas followed in 2004.
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