SONIC-RECREATION.COM high definition, high definition LP to Digital [FLAC] transfer services. A division of H8 Enterprises.



Paul Simon

Read Paul Simon's biography



Paul Simon - There Goes Rhymin' Simon [Columbia KC 32280] (1973)

Go to http://www.dynamicrange.de
for more information

LP to Digital [FLAC] transfer bundle $39.99
plus shipping

ITEM# SR-COKC32280
Ratings: C=G+; LP=G-

Ships in 3 to 6
business days.


Artist:

Paul Simon

Title:

There Goes Rhymin' Simon

Released: 1973
Label: Columbia
Catalog: KC 32280
Genre: Pop / Rock


T R A C K L I S T:
01-Kodachrome
02-Tenderness
03-Take Me To The Mardi Gras
04-Something So Right
05-One Man's Ceiling Is Another Man's Floor
06-American Tune
07-Was A Sunny Day
08-Learn How To Fall
09-St. Judy's Comet
10-Loves Me Like A Rock
Submit a review.

Album Review

There Goes Rhymin' Simon is the logical second step in Paul Simon's solo recording career, and it is a dazzlingly surefooted one. Despite its many light, humorous moments, the core theme of his first album, Paul Simon, was depressing: fear of death, its focal point a sung poem, "Everything Put Together Falls Apart," that while worthy of comparison with the best work of John Berryman, could hardly be called "easy listening." Since the album dealt with anxiety, it communicated anxiety and was difficult in places to accept as entertainment. This isn't true of Rhymin' Simon. Like its predecessor, it is a fully realized work of art, of genius in fact, but one that is also endlessly listenable on every level. Simon has never sounded so assured vocally. He demonstrates in several places pyrotechnical skills that approach Harry Nilsson's (in embellishment of ballad phrases) and John Lennon's (in letting it all hang out), though for the most part, Simon's deliveries are straight - restrained and supple, bowing as they should to the material, which is of the very highest order.

Rhymin' Simon shows, once and for all, that Simon is now the consummate master of the contemporary narrative song - one of a very few practicing singer/songwriters able to impart wisdom as much by implication as by direct statement. Here, even more than in the first album, Simon successfully communicates the deepest kinds of love without ever becoming rhetorical or overly sentimental. The chief factor in his remarkable growth since Simon and Garfunkel days has been the development of a gently wry humor that is objective, even fatalistic, though never bitter.

Thematically, Rhymin' Simon represents a sweeping outward gesture from the introspection of the first album. Simon has triumphantly relocated his sensibility in the general scheme of things: as a musician, as a poet of the American tragedy, and most importantly as a family man. Rhymin' Simon celebrates, above all, familial bonds, which are seen as an antidote, perhaps the only antidote, to psychic disintegration in a terminally diseased society. As an expression of one man's credo, therefore, it is a profoundly affirmative album. [rollingstone.com]


Paul Simon - Live Rhymin' Paul Simon In Concert [CBS S 69059] (1981)

LP to Digital [FLAC] transfer bundle $49.99
plus shipping

ITEM# SR-CBS69059
Ratings: C=VG+; LP=VG+

Please allow two to three weeks for delivery.

Artist:

Paul Simon

Title:

Live Rhymin' Paul Simon In Concert

Released: 1981
Label: CBS
Catalog: S 69059
Genre: Rock / Folk
Note: Import Made in England


T R A C K L I S T:
01 Me And Julio Down By The Schoolyard
02 Homeward Bound
03 American Tune
04 El Condor Pasa (If I Could)
05 Duncan
06 The Boxer
07 Mother And Child Reunion
08 The Sound Of Silence
09 Jesus Is The Answer
10 Bridge Over Troubled Water
11 Loves Me Like A Rock
12 America
Submit a review.

Album Review

Paul Simon in Concert: Live Rhymin' is an album by Paul Simon, released in March 1974 by Columbia Records. It was recorded in the wake of the release of There Goes Rhymin' Simon - which produced a number of hit singles (''Kodachrome'' and ''Loves Me Like a Rock'') and radio staples (as ''Something So Right'' and ''Take Me to the Mardi Gras'') during Simon's 1973-74 tour, at Nassau Veterans Memorial Coliseum, New York, July 10th, 1973. However, the album presents a very truncated version of the concerts he performed on this tour, which consisted of up to 24 songs. The album fails to note where the performances were recorded, although according to liner notes in a later Simon compilation, ''Duncan'' is from a London concert and ''American Tune'' was recorded in New York City.

Simon was joined by Urubamba and the Jessy Dixon Singers, although the individual members are not identified either on the recording or on the liner notes. In addition to ''Jesus Is the Answer'', included on the album, Jessy Dixon also performed ''What Do They Call Him'' on tour, while Urubamba performed the instrumentals ''Kacharpari'' and ''Death in Santa Cruz''.

The album was Simon's first live release and showed him performing Simon & Garfunkel songs solo in concert for the first time. The variety of songs and richness of styles helped with the album's appeal. Most notable was Simon's fascination with gospel, something that materialized in the arrangements on many of the songs, taking distance from Simon's classical folk early style.

Near the end of the album, an audience member calls out for Simon to ''say a few words.'' He replies: ''Say a few words? Well, let's hope that we continue to live.''

The album was a moderate success. It reached #33 in the U.S. and was eventually certified gold by the RIAA. However, it failed to chart at all in the UK. Further, two of the live performances were released as a single as part of the promotion for the album: the breakthrough Simon & Garfunkel ''The Sound of Silence'' as the A-side, along with Simon's debut single ''Mother and Child Reunion'' on the B-side. [wikipedia.org]


Paul Simon - One-Trick Pony [Warner Bros HS 3472] (1980)

Go to http://www.dynamicrange.de
for more information

LP to Digital [FLAC] transfer bundle $44.99
plus shipping

ITEM# SR-WBHS3472
Ratings: C=NM-; LP=NM-

Please allow two to three weeks for delivery.

Artist:

Paul Simon

Title:

One-Trick Pony

Released: 1980
Label: Warner Bros
Catalog: HS 3472
Genre: Rock
T R A C K L I S T:
01 Late In The Evening
02 That's Why God Made The Movies
03 One-Trick Pony
04 How The Heart Approaches What It Yearns
05 Oh, Marion
06 Ace In The Hole
07 Nobody
08 Jonah
09 God Bless The Absentee
10 Long, Long Day
Submit a review.

Album Review

William Ruhlmann [allmusic.com]

Though it was released to coincide with the opening of the film One-Trick Pony, which Paul Simon wrote and starred in, the One-Trick Pony album is not a soundtrack, as it is sometimes categorized, at least, not exactly. If it were, it might contain the Paul Simon song "Soft Parachutes" and other non-Simon music featured in the movie. Instead, this is a studio album containing many of the movie songs, some of them in the same performances (two were cut live at the Agora Club in Cleveland). The record is not billed as a soundtrack, but a sleeve note reads, "The music on this Compact Disc was created for the Paul Simon Movie 'One-Trick Pony.'" Anyway, if Simon was in fact writing songs for Jonah, his movie character (as seems true of songs like "Jonah," "God Bless the Absentee," and "Long, Long Day"), he intended that character to take a somewhat less considered lyrical viewpoint than Paul Simon generally does, but to be even more enamored of light jazz fusion than Paul Simon had been on his last album, Still Crazy After All These Years. Tasty licks abound from the fretwork of Eric Gale, Hiram Bullock, and Hugh McCracken, and the rhythm section of Steve Gadd, Tony Levin, and Richard Tee is equally in the groove. This is the closest thing to a band album Simon ever made, and it contains some of his most rhythmic and energetic singing. But it is also his most uneven album, simply because the songwriting, with the exception of the title song and the ballads "How the Heart Approaches What It Yearns" and "Nobody," is not up to his usual standard. Maybe he was too busy writing his screenplay to polish these songs to the usual gloss. (It can't have been than Jonah wasn't supposed to be as talented as Paul Simon. Could it?) In any case, though the album spawned a Top Ten hit in "Late in the Evening" and may have sold more copies than the film did tickets, it remained a disappointment in both artistic and commercial terms.


Paul Simon - Hearts And Bones [Warner Bros 1-23942] (4 November 1983)

Go to http://www.dynamicrange.de
for more information

LP to Digital [FLAC] transfer bundle $44.99
plus shipping

ITEM# SR-WA123942
Ratings: C=NM-; LP=NM-

Ships in 3 to 6
business days.


Artist:

Paul Simon

Title:

Hearts And Bones

Released: 4 November 1983
Label: Warner Bros
Catalog: 1-23942
Genre: Rock, Folk Rock


Matrix / Runout (Side A):
1.2.3942A INT10 SLM STERLING [triangle]5491 1-1

Matrix / Runout (Side B):
1.2.3942B-SH9 SLM STERLING [triangle]5490-X 1-1 B-18678-SH-9
T R A C K L I S T:
01 Allergies
02 Hearts And Bones
03 When Numbers Get Serious
04 Think Too Much (b)
05 Song About The Moon
06 Think Too Much (a)
07 Train In The Distance
08 Rene And Georgette Magritte With Their Dog After The War
09 Cars Are Cars
10 The Late Great Johnny Ace
Submit a review.

Album Review

William Ruhlmann [allmusic.com]

Hearts and Bones was a commercial disaster, the lowest-charting new studio album of Paul Simon's career. It is also his most personal collection of songs, one of his most ambitious, and one of his best. It retains a personal vision, one largely devoted to the challenges of middle-aged life, among them a renewed commitment to love; the title song was a notable testament to new romance, while ''Train in the Distance'' reflected on romantic discord. Elsewhere, ''The Late Great Johnny Ace'' was his meditation on John Lennon's murder and how it related to the mythology of pop music. Musically, Simon moved forward and backward simultaneously, taking off from the jazz fusion style of his last two albums into his old loves of doo wop and rock & roll while also incorporating current sounds with such new collaborators as dance music producer Nile Rodgers and minimalist composer Philip Glass. The result was Simon's most impressive collection in a decade and the most underrated album in his catalog.


Paul Simon - Graceland [Warner Bros 1-25447] (1986)

Go to http://www.dynamicrange.de
for more information

LP to Digital [FLAC] transfer bundle $49.99
plus shipping

ITEM# SR-WA125447
Ratings: C=NM-; LP=NM-

Ships in 3 to 6
business days.


Artist:

Paul Simon

Title:

Graceland

Released: 1986
Label: Warner Bros
Catalog: 1-25447
Genre: Jazz, Rock, Funk / Soul, Pop, Folk, World, & Country


Matrix / Runout (Side A):
12646 1-3 125447-A-RE2-S41 B-23620-Re2-SH1 STERLING DMM

Matrix / Runout (Side B):
STERLING DMM 12646-X 2-6 1-25447-B RE-1 DMM 5H4 B-23621-Re1-SH4
T R A C K L I S T:
01-The Boy In The Bubble
02-Graceland
03-I Know What I Know
04-Gumboots
05-Diamonds On The Soles Of Her Shoes
06-You Can Call Me Al
07-Under African Skies
08-Homeless
09-Crazy Love, Vol. II
10-That Was Your Mother
11-All Around The World Or The Myth Of Fingerprints
Submit a review.

Album Review

William Ruhlmann [allmusic.com]

With Graceland, Paul Simon hit on the idea of combining his always perceptive songwriting with the little-heard mbaqanga music of South Africa, creating a fascinating hybrid that re-enchanted his old audience and earned him a new one. It is true that the South African angle (including its controversial aspect during the apartheid days) was a powerful marketing tool and that the catchy music succeeded in presenting listeners with that magical combination: something they'd never heard before that nevertheless sounded familiar. As eclectic as any record Simon had made, it also delved into zydeco and conjunto-flavored rock & roll while marking a surprising new lyrical approach (presaged on some songs on Hearts and Bones); for the most part, Simon abandoned a linear, narrative approach to his words, instead drawing highly poetic ("Diamonds on the Soles of Her Shoes"), abstract ("The Boy in the Bubble"), and satiric ("I Know What I Know") portraits of modern life, often charged by striking images and turns of phrase torn from the headlines or overheard in contemporary speech. An enormously successful record, Graceland became the standard against which subsequent musical experiments by major artists were measured.

Paul Simon's Biography

Mark Deming [allmusic.com]

Paul Simon is one of the most successful and respected songwriters of the second half of the 20th century. Rising to fame in the mid-'60s, Simon's songs were mature and literate, but also melodically engaging, and spoke to the concerns and uncertainties of a generation. As the 1960s gave way to the '70s and '80s, Simon's work tended to focus on the personal rather than the larger world, but he also expanded his musical palette, and helped introduce many rock and pop fans to world music.

Paul Frederic Simon was born in Newark, New Jersey on October 13, 1941. His father, Louis Simon, was an educator who also led a small jazz combo, while his mother, Belle Simon, taught English; when Paul was a few months old, they moved from Newark to Queens, New York. Paul grew up with a passion for baseball and music, particularly jazz and folk, and as he entered his teens, he developed a taste for the doo wop and R&B sounds that were a staple of Alan Freed's radio broadcasts, as well as first-generation rockabillies such as Elvis Presley, Jerry Lee Lewis, and Carl Perkins. When Simon was 11 years old, he met Art Garfunkel, and the two became fast friends who discovered they shared an interest in music. Paul and Art formed a harmony duo in the style of their heroes the Everly Brothers, and made their stage debut at a junior-high talent show. By the time they were enrolled at Forest Hills High School, the two were calling themselves Tom & Jerry (Art was Tom Graph, Paul was Jerry Landis), and they filled their spare time playing teen dances and parties. In 1955, the two wrote a song together, "The Girl for Me," which Simon registered for copyright with the Library of Congress. In 1957, Tom & Jerry were cutting a demo acetate of Simon's song "Hey Schoolgirl" when the president of a small record company (ironically named Big Records) happened by the studio. The label head liked what he heard, and "Hey Schoolgirl" b/w "Dancin' Wild" was released in the fall of 1957. The record rose to number 52 on the Billboard pop singles charts, and scored Tom & Jerry an appearance on American Bandstand, but while they would cut a number of follow-up releases, "Hey Schoolgirl" was destined to be Tom & Jerry's only hit.

By March 1958, Simon was already looking toward a solo career, cutting a single, "True or False" b/w "Teen Age Fool," under the name True Taylor. Jerry Landis also landed his own record deal, releasing his debut single, "Anna Belle" b/w "Loneliness," in 1959, while Simon also worked with a studio group called the Cosines, who specialized in cutting demos for songwriters. (Another member of the combo was Carole Klein, who would soon enjoy a successful career of her own as Carole King.) By the end of the decade, Paul and Art were both enrolled in college, and Tom & Jerry took a back seat to academics, though Simon would record occasional sessions and wrote songs for others. In 1961, Simon teamed up with a handful of vocalists to form a group called Tico & the Triumphs; the group cut a single, "Motorcycle" b/w "I Don't Believe Them," which barely broke into the Billboard singles charts, making Number 99 for one week, but received extensive airplay in Baltimore and became a local hit in the Charm City. "Motorcycle" was released by Amy Records, who soon turned to Simon to write and produce material for several of their artists, including Ritchie Cordell, the Fashions, Dottie Daniels, and Jay Walker & the Pedestrians. Simon also found time to cut another Jerry Landis single, and "The Lone Teen Ranger" spent three weeks on the Billboard charts in early 1963, peaking at number 97.

In the early '60s, the folk revival swept New York City, and a new breed of singers and songwriters introduced a new approach to the craft of creating tunes. Simon, who had been studying English literature, was influenced and encouraged by the new breed of folkies, and in 1963 he re-teamed with Art Garfunkel, this time using their real names and performing the more topical songs Simon was writing. Simon & Garfunkel started playing Greenwich Village folk clubs, and they scored a deal with Columbia Records, releasing their first album, Wednesday Morning, 3 AM, in the fall of 1964. The album was initially a flop, and Simon headed to England, where he made the rounds of folk clubs, recorded some BBC sessions, and even cut a solo album, The Paul Simon Songbook, which was released only in the UK. Simon also co-wrote a few pop tunes with Bruce Woodley of the Seekers, one of which, "Red Rubber Ball," would become a big hit for the Cyrkle. In late 1965, Tom Wilson, who produced the Wednesday Morning, 3 AM album, learned that one of the songs from the LP, "The Sound of Silence," was getting scattered radio airplay, and he struck upon the idea of dubbing a rock & roll rhythm section over the acoustic track and issuing it as a single. The strategy worked: the new version of "The Sound of Silence" was a big hit, and Simon & Garfunkel quickly re-formed, cutting the album Sounds of Silence, which was released in 1966 and spawned the singles "I Am a Rock" and "Kathy's Song."

Simon & Garfunkel would enjoy impressive success over the next several years, and were one of the few acts from the early-'60s folk revival that would enjoy success with acoustic-based music during the psychedelic era, thanks in large part to Simon's songwriting. But while 1970's Bridge Over Troubled Water was a massive commercial and critical success (and a superb reflection of the end-of-the-decade Zeitgeist of the day), long-simmering creative differences between Simon and Garfunkel came to a head while making the album, and a hiatus from collaborating became a proper breakup when Simon released his self-titled solo album in 1972. Paul Simon featured two hit singles, "Mother and Child Reunion" and "Me and Julio Down by the Schoolyard," and found Simon experimenting with reggae and Latin music, as well as polished soft rock.

Released in 1973, There Goes Rhymin' Simon was a more ambitious follow-up, sounding largely optimistic and dipping its toes into gospel and New Orleans jazz as well as R&B-based rock and pop. In 1975, Simon released Still Crazy After All These Years, an album informed by his divorce from his first wife, Peggy Harper. Still Crazy included the song "My Little Town," which reunited Simon with Art Garfunkel for the first time since Bridge Over Troubled Water. Simon's next project proved to have a long gestation period; he wrote a screenplay about a musician struggling to save his marriage and his career, and penned a set of songs to accompany it. Simon also starred in the subsequent film, and while One Trick Pony wasn't his first bit of film acting (he played a small but memorable role in Woody Allen's Annie Hall), he didn't fare well alongside a cast of seasoned professionals when the movie debuted in 1980. One Trick Pony's soundtrack album (his first album for Warner Bros. after a long working relationship with Columbia) spawned the hit single "Late in the Evening," but otherwise proved to be a disappointment in terms of sales.

In September 1981, Simon & Garfunkel played a massive reunion concert in New York's Central Park, which led to a brief reunion tour. The Central Park show was released as a live album that was a major commercial success, and the duo made plans to record a new album. But Simon and Garfunkel found themselves at odds in the studio, and Simon's next album, 1983's Hearts and Bones, featured no contributions from Garfunkel. The album sold poorly, and by Simon's own admission he was running short on inspiration when he heard an album of "township jive" by the South African group the Boyoyo Boys. Fascinated by the eclectic blend of creative elements, Simon began creating an album inspired by South African pop, recorded primarily in Johannesburg with a band of South African musicians. The result was 1986's Graceland, which became an unexpected smash hit, spawning several hits singles, introducing an international audience to South African rhythms, and prompting a renewed dialogue about the nation's repressive apartheid regime. (The album also generated a certain amount of controversy, as some believed the recording sessions violated a United Nations-led cultural boycott against South Africa; also, several members of the group Los Lobos, who appeared on the album, claimed Simon lifted their melody for the tune "All Around the World, or the Myth of Fingerprints" without giving them songwriting credit.) Simon turned to Brazilian music for inspiration on his next album, 1990's The Rhythm of the Saints, which also incorporated a number of the South African players who contributed to Graceland. If not as successful as Graceland, The Rhythm of the Saints still fared quite well with fans and critics, and the two albums reestablished Simon as a vital, contemporary artist.

After releasing a live album from the tour in support of The Rhythm of the Saints, Simon retreated to work on another unusual project, a Broadway musical called The Capeman, which was based on the true story of Salvador Agron, a Latino gang member and convicted murderer turned poet and activist. Simon wrote the book for The Capeman in collaboration with Derek Walcott, and composed a set of new songs for the show. However, the production proved difficult and the play, which opened in 1998, received poor reviews and closed after just 68 performances due to slow ticket sales. (A revised version of the show was staged in 2010, and received significantly better notices.) An album of Simon's interpretations of the show's songs was issued, but was only a modest success; the original cast recording received a belated digital release in 2006.

Stung by the disappointing response to The Capeman, Simon returned to the studio in 2000 to record You're the One, an album that suggested a compromise between the African and Latin sounds he'd embraced and the more intimate approach of his early work. Two years later, Simon once again reunited with Art Garfunkel for a concert tour, and a live album, Old Friends: Live on Stage, was released in 2004. Simon returned in 2006 with Surprise, which found him working with an unlikely producer, Brian Eno. Released in 2011, So Beautiful or So What captured Simon returning to a more organic songwriting style than he'd employed since Graceland, though the tenor of the lyrics confirmed he was still keenly aware of the sounds and ideas of the present day. The album was also his first release for Hear Music; the same label released 2012's Live in New York City, taken from a special intimate hometown concert from the tour in support of So Beautiful.
Questions or comments? Send us E-mail.
Send us E-mail
    © Copyright 2011-2019 - SONIC-RECREATION.COM is a division of H8 Enterprises. Designed by John Haight. All Rights Reserved.