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Rush

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Rush - Permanent Waves [Mercury SRM-1-4001] (7 Jan 1980)

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Artist:

Rush

Title:

Permanent Waves

Released: 7 Jan 1980
Label: Mercury
Catalog: SRM-1-4001
Genre: Rock, Prog Rock


T R A C K L I S T:
01 The Spirit Of Radio
02 Freewill
03 Jacob's Ladder
04 Entre Nous
05 Different Strings

06 Natural Science

I Tide Pools
II Hyperspace
III Permanent Waves
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Album Review

Permanent Waves is the seventh studio album by the Canadian rock band Rush, released in January 1980 on Anthem Records. After touring to support their previous album Hemispheres (1978) ended, the band took a short break before they regrouped to work on new material. The album marked a departure in their musical style towards tighter song structures and songs more suitable for radio airplay. Permanent Waves was recorded in late 1979 at Le Studio in Morin Heights, Quebec and with co-producer Terry Brown and mixed at Trident Studios in London.

Permanent Waves received a mostly positive reception from critics, and became their most successful album at the time of release, reaching number 3 in Canada and the United Kingdom and number 4 in the United States. The album was certified platinum in the latter by the Recording Industry Association of America for selling one million copies. Rush released ''The Spirit of Radio'', ''Freewill'', and ''Entre Nous'' as singles, and supported the album with their 19791980 tour. [wikipedia.org]


Artist:

Rush

Title:

Moving Pictures

Released: 1981
Label: Mercury
Catalog: SRM-1-4013
Genre: Progressive Rock
T R A C K L I S T:
01 Tom Sawyer
02 Red Barchetta
03 YYZ
04 Limenoch_light
05 The Camera Eye
06 Witch Hunt
07 Vital Signs
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Album Review

Greg Prato [allmusic.com]

Not only is 1981's Moving Pictures Rush's best album, it is undeniably one of the greatest hard rock albums of all time. The new wave meets hard rock alan_parsonsroach of Permanent Waves is honed to perfection -- all seven of the tracks are classics (four are still featured regularly in concert and on classic rock radio). While other hard rock bands at the time experimented unsuccessfully with other musical styles, Rush were one of the few to successfully cross over. The whole entire first side is perfect -- their most renowned song, "Tom Sawyer," kicks things off, and is soon followed by the racing "Red Barchetta," the instrumental "YYZ," and a song that examines the pros and cons of stardom, "Limenoch_light." And while the second side isn't as instantly striking as the first, it is ultimately rewarding. The long and winding "The Camera Eye" begins with a synth-driven piece before transforming into one of the band's more straight-ahead epics, while "Witch Hunt" and "Vital Signs" remain two of the trio's more underrated rock compositions. Rush proved with Moving Pictures that there was still uncharted territory to explore within the hard rock format, and were rewarded with their most enduring and popular album.


Rush - Signals [Mercury SRM-1-4063] (9 September 1982)

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Artist:

Rush

Title:

Signals

Released: 9 September 1982
Label: Mercury
Catalog: SRM-1-4063
Genre: Rock, Progressive Rock


T R A C K L I S T:
01 Subdivisions
02 The Analog Kid
03 Chemistry
04 Digital Man
05 The Weapon
06 New World Man
07 Losing It
08 Countdown
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Album Review

Greg Prato [allmusic.com]

Instead of playing it safe and writing Moving Pictures, Pt. II, Rush replaced their heavy rock of yesteryear with even more modern sounds for 1982's Signals. Synthesizers were now an integral part of the band's sound, and replaced electric guitars as the driving force for almost all the tracks. And more current and easier-to-grasp topics (teen peer pressure, repression, etc.) replaced their trusty old sci-fi-inspired lyrics. While other rock bands suddenly added keyboards to their sound to widen their appeal, Rush gradually merged electronics into their music over the years, so such tracks as the popular MTV video ''Subdivisions'' did not come as a shock to longtime fans. And Rush didn't forget how to rock out -- ''The Analog Kid'' and ''Digital Man'' were some of their most up-tempo compositions in years. The surprise hit, ''New World Man,'' and ''Chemistry'' combined reggae and rock (begun on 1980's Permanent Waves), ''The Weapon'' bordered on new wave, the placid ''Losing It'' featured Ben Mink on electric violin, while the epic closer ''Countdown'' painted a vivid picture of a space shuttle launch. Signals proved that Rush were successfully adapting to the musical climate of the early '80s.

Rush's Biography

Jason Ankeny [allmusic.com]

Over the course of their decades-spanning career, Canadian power trio Rush emerged as one of hard rock's most highly regarded bands; although typically brushed aside by critics and rarely the recipients of mainstream pop radio airplay, Rush nonetheless won an impressive and devoted fan following, while their virtuoso performance skills solidified their standing as musicians' musicians.

Rush formed in Toronto, Ontario, in the autumn of 1968, initially comprised of guitarist Alex Lifeson (born Alexander Zivojinovich), vocalist/bassist Geddy Lee (born Gary Lee Weinrib), and drummer John Rutsey. In their primary incarnation, Rush drew a heavy influence from Cream, and honed their skills on the Toronto club circuit before issuing their debut single, a rendition of Buddy Holly's "Not Fade Away," in 1973. A self-titled LP followed in 1974, at which time Rutsey exited; he was replaced by drummer Neil Peart, who also assumed the role of the band's primary songwriter, composing the cerebral lyrics (influenced by works of science fiction and fantasy) that gradually became a hallmark of the group's aesthetic.

With Peart firmly ensconced, the band returned in 1975 with a pair of LPs, Fly by Night and Caress of Steel. Their next effort, 1976's 2112, proved their breakthrough release: a futuristic concept album based on the writings of Ayn Rand, it fused the elements of the trio's sound -- Lee's high-pitched vocals, Peart's epic drumming, and Lifeson's complex guitar work -- into a unified whole. Fans loved it -- 2112 was the first in a long line of gold and platinum releases -- while critics dismissed it as overblown and pretentious; either way, it established a formula from which the band rarely deviated throughout the duration of its career.

A Farewell to Kings followed in 1977 and reached the Top 40 in both the U.S. and Britain. After 1978's Hemispheres, Rush achieved even greater popularity with 1980's Permanent Waves, a record marked by the group's dramatic shift into shorter, less sprawling compositions; the single "The Spirit of Radio" even became a major hit. With 1981's Moving Pictures, they scored another hit of sorts with "Tom Sawyer," which garnered heavy exposure on album-oriented radio and became perhaps the trio's best-known song. As the 1980s continued, Rush grew into a phenomenally popular live draw as albums like 1982's Signals (which generated the smash "New World Man"), 1984's Grace Under Pressure, and 1985's Power Windows continued to sell millions of copies.

As the decade drew to a close, the trio cut back on its touring schedule while hardcore followers complained of a sameness afflicting slicker, synth-driven efforts like 1987's Hold Your Fire and 1989's Presto. At the dawn of the '90s, however, Rush returned to the heavier sound of their early records and placed a renewed emphasis on Lifeson's guitar heroics; consequently, both 1991's Roll the Bones and 1993's Counterparts reached the Top Three on the U.S. album charts. In 1996, the band issued Test for Echo and headed out on the road the following summer. Shortly thereafter, Peart lost his daughter in an automobile accident. Tragedy struck again in 1998 when Peart's wife succumbed to cancer.

Dire times in the Rush camp did not cause the band to quit. Lee took time out for a solo stint with 2000's My Favorite Headache; however, rumors of the band playing in the studio began to circulate. It would be five years until anything surfaced from the band. Fans were reassured in early 2002 by news that Rush were recording new songs in Toronto. The fruit of those sessions led to the release of Rush's 17th studio album, Vapor Trails, later that spring. By the end of the year a concert from the supporting tour was released on DVD as Rush in Rio.

In 2004 Rush embarked on their 30th anniversary tour, documented on the DVD R30, and in 2006 they returned to the studio to begin work on a new album. The resulting Snakes & Arrows was released in May 2007, followed by the CD/DVD set Snakes & Arrows Live in early 2008. Material from the latter was combined with footage from Rush in Rio and R30 for the CD/DVD compilation Working Men, which was released in 2009. A documentary on the band assembled by Toronto's Bangor Productions called Beyond the Lighted Stage alan_parsonseared in 2010, followed a year later by another Bangor video production, Time Machine 2011: Live in Cleveland. Rush's 19th full-length studio album, Clockwork Angels, arrived in June of 2012. While the following year wouldn't bring a new album, it did deliver the next best thing by way of Vapor Trails: Remixed, which found producer David Bottrill revisiting one of the more notable victims of the so-called loudness wars. Along with a freshly repaired album, the band also released Clockwork Angels Tour, a three-disc live album recorded during their 2012 tour.
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