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Paul McCartney

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Paul McCartney / Wings - Wild Life [Apple Records SW 3386] (7 December 1971)

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ITEM# SR-APSW3386
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Artist:

Paul McCartney / Wings

Title:

Wild Life

Released: 7 December 1971
Label: Apple Records
Catalog: SW 3386
Genre: Rock, Soft Rock


T R A C K L I S T:
01 Mumbo
02 Bip Bop
03 Love Is Strange
04 Wild Life
05 Some People Never Know
06 I Am Your Singer
07 Tomorrow
08 Dear Friend
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Album Review

Wild Life is the debut album by Wings and the third studio album by Paul McCartney since the breakup of the Beatles. The album was recorded during July–August 1971 at Abbey Road Studios by McCartney and his wife Linda along with session drummer Denny Seiwell, whom they had worked with on the previous album, Ram, and Denny Laine, formerly of the Moody Blues. It was released by Apple Records on 7 December, in both the UK and US, to lukewarm critical and commercial reaction. [wikipedia.org]


Live And Let Die (G. Martin-P. McCartney) [Soundtrack] (United Artists UA-LA100-G) (1973)

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ITEM# SR-UALA100G
Ratings: C=VG+; LP=VG+

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Artist:

G. Martin/P. McCartney

Title:

Live And Let Die

Released: 1973
Label: United Artists
Catalog: UA-LA100-G
Genre: Soundtrack
T R A C K L I S T:
01 Live And Let Die
02 Just A Closer Walk With Thee/New Second Line
03 Bond Meets Solitaire
04 Whisper Who Dares
05 Snakes Alive
06 Baron Samedi's Dance Of Death
07 San Monique
08 Fillet Of Soul (New Orleans) /
Live And Let Die /
Fillet Of Soul (Harlem)
09 Bond Drops In
10 If He Finds It, Kill Him
11 Trespassers Will Be Eaten
12 Solitaire Gets Her Cards
13 Sacrifice
14 James Bond Theme
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Paul McCartney & Wings - Venus And Mars [Capitol SMAS-11419] (1975)

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ITEM# SR-CASMAS11419
Ratings: C=G+; LP=G+

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Artist:

Paul McCartney & Wings

Title:

Venus And Mars

Released: 1975
Label: Capitol
Catalog: SMAS-11419
Genre: Pop Rock
Note: Includes 1 poster and 1 decal


T R A C K L I S T:
01 Venus And Mars
02 Rock Show
03 Love In Song
04 You Gave Me The Answer
05 Magneto And Titanium Man
06 Letting Go
07 Venus And Mars (Reprise)
08 Spirits Of Ancient Egypt
09 Medicine Jar
10 Call Me Back Again
11 Listen To What The Man Said
12 Treat Her Gently / Lonely Old People
13 Crossroads Theme
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Album Review

Venus and Mars is the fourth studio album by Wings. Released in 1975 as the follow-up to the successful Band on the Run, Venus and Mars continued Wings' string of success and would prove a springboard for a year-long worldwide tour. It was Paul McCartney's first post-Beatles album to be released worldwide on the Capitol Records label. [wikipedia.org]


Paul McCartney/Wings 1976 At The Speed Of Sound (Capitol SW-11525)

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ITEM# SR-CASW11525
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Artist:

Paul McCartney/Wings

Title:

At The Speed Of Sound

Released: 1976
Label: Capitol
Catalog: SW-11525
Genre: Rock
T R A C K L I S T:
01 Let 'em In
02 The Note You Never Wrote
03 She's My Baby
04 Beware My Love
05 Wino Junko
06 Silly Love Songs
07 Cook Of The House
08 Time To Hide
09 Must Do Something About It
10 San Ferry Anne
11 Warm And Beautiful
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Paul McCartney-Wings - Wings Over America (Capitol SWCO-11593) (1976)

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ITEM# SR-CASWCO11593
Ratings: C=VG+; LP=VG+

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Artist:

Paul McCartney/Wings

Title:

Wings Over America

Released: 1976
Label: Capitol
Catalog: SWCO-11593
Genre: Rock
NOTE: 3LPs on 2CDs
T R A C K L I S T:
[Disc 1]
01 Venus And Mars/Rockshow/Jet
02 Let Me Roll It
03 Spirits Of Ancient Egypt
04 Medicine Jar
05 Maybe I'm Amazed
06 Call Me Back Again
07 Lady Madonna
08 The Long And Winding Road
09 Live And Let Die
10 Picasso's Last Words
11 Richard Cory
12 Bluebird
13 I've Just Seen A Face
14 Blackbird
15 Yesterday

[Disc 2]
01 You Gave Me The Answer
02 Magneto And Titanium Man
03 Go Now
04 My Love
05 Listen To What The Man Said
06 Let 'em In
07 Time To Hide
08 Silly Love Songs
09 Beware My Love
10 Letting Go
11 Band On The Run
12 Hi, Hi, Hi
13 Soily
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Album Review

by Stephen Thomas Erlewine

Basically, there are two things that rock bands do: they make an album and they go on tour. Since Paul McCartney fervently wanted to believe Wings was a real rock band, he had the group record an album or two and then took them on the road. In March of 1976 he released Wings at the Speed of Sound and launched a tour of America, following which he released Wings Over America, a triple-album set that re-created an entire concert from various venues. It was a massive set list, running over two hours and featuring 30 songs, and it was well received at the time, partially because he revived some Beatles tunes, partially because it wasn't the disaster some naysayers expected, and mostly because -- like the tour itself -- it was the first chance that millions of Beatles fans had to hear McCartney in concert properly (the Beatles had toured, to be sure, and had played before millions of people between 1963 and 1966, but as a result of the relatively primitive equipment they used and the frenzied, omnipresent screaming of the mid-'60s teen audiences at their shows, few of those present had actually "heard" the group). Wings were never a particularly gifted band, and nowhere is that more evident than on Wings Over America. Matters aren't really helped by the fact that the large set list gives McCartney full opportunity to show off his vast array of affected voices, from crooner to rocker to bluesman. Also, the repertory, in retrospect, is weighted too heavily toward the recent Wings albums Wings at the Speed of Sound and Band on the Run, which weren't really loaded with great tunes. (It's also hard to believe that there were two Denny Laine vocals so early in the program, or that the concert ended with the plodding rocker "Soily," which was never released on any other McCartney album.) In its defense, the album offers bracing renditions of "Maybe I'm Amazed" -- arguably the best of McCartney's post-Beatles songs and possibly his single greatest composition -- and "Band on the Run," as well as nicely distilling the harder side of his repertory, with a few breaks for softer songs such as "My Love" and "Silly Love Songs"; another highlight is the rippling bass sound, showing off that instrument in a manner closer in spirit to, say, a John Entwistle solo LP than to McCartney's more pop-focused studio work. The triple LP, issued two weeks before Christmas of 1976, was priced so low that it was offered by most stores as a "loss leader" to pull customers in; what's more, the Beatles mystique was still very much attached to record and artist alike -- at the time, John Lennon had seemingly burnt out a major chunk of his talent, George Harrison was losing his popular edge and had done a disastrous 1974 American tour, and no one was expecting great things from Ringo Starr -- and it seemed like McCartney represented the part of the group's legacy that came closest to living up to fans' expectations. Thus the album ended up selling in numbers, rivaling the likes of Frampton Comes Alive and other mega-hits of the period, and rode the charts for months. The double-CD reissue offers considerably improved sound, though the combination of workmanlike performances and relatively pedestrian songs diminishes the appeal of such small pleasures as the acoustic Beatles set or the storming "Hi Hi Hi." Wings Over America is most valuable as a souvenir for hardcore fans and also as a reminder of the excitement -- beyond the actual merits of the group's work -- that attended McCartney and Wings' work in the lingering afterglow of the Beatles.


Paul McCartney / Wings - London Town [Capitol SW-11777] (3-31-1978)

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Artist:

Paul McCartney / Wings

Title:

London Town

Released: 3-31-1978
Label: Capitol
Catalog: SW-11777
Genre: Rock


T R A C K L I S T:
01 London Town
02 Cafe On The Left Bank
03 I'm Carrying
04 Backwards Traveller
05 Cuff Link
06 Children Children
07 Girlfriend
08 I've Had Enough
09 With A Little Luck
10 Famous Groupies
11 Deliver Your Children
12 Name And Address
13 Don't Let It Bring You Down
14 Morse Moose And The Grey Goose
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Album Review

London Town is the sixth studio album by Wings, released in 1978. The album had a long and tumultuous gestation which saw the loss of two band members, the birth of a baby and the release of the then best-selling single in British history.

After the commercial zenith of 1976 with Wings at the Speed of Sound and its well-received Wings Over the World tour, Wings' leader Paul McCartney planned on making 1977 a similar year. However, things did not quite work out as planned.

In February 1977, Wings began recording sessions at Abbey Road Studios, which continued until the end of March. Here, Wings recorded five songs: ''Girls' School'', ''Name and Address'', ''London Town'', ''Children, Children'' and Linda McCartney's ''B-Side to Seaside'', later issued as the flip-side of the Wings single ''Seaside Woman'' (issued under the name ''Suzy and the Red Stripes''). The initial plan of touring the US again was thwarted by Linda's discovery that she was pregnant with her and Paul's third child. (Mary had been born in 1969 and Stella in 1971). With the knowledge that they were not going to tour and had time at their disposal – and once again looking for different locales to record in – Wings found themselves moored on a yacht called ''Fair Carol'' in the Virgin Islands during the month of May where several new songs were recorded. Reflecting the nautical locale, the album's initial working title was Water Wings. As Linda's pregnancy progressed, the band halted the sessions for the album, save for the recording of a new track called ''Mull of Kintyre'' that August and the completion of the already begun ''Girls' School'', which would be released as a single – Wings' one and only release in 1977.

Before the single's release came two defections from Wings: drummer Joe English had become homesick for America and returned home, and lead guitarist Jimmy McCulloch left Wings to join the Small Faces that September. For the first time since 1973's Band on the Run, Wings were down to the core three of Paul, Linda and Denny Laine, reflected on the picture sleeve of the single, which showed the three remaining members.

In November, two months after the birth of son James, and shortly after sessions for London Town resumed, the Scottish tribute ''Mull of Kintyre'' was released to enormous commercial success, becoming the UK's biggest-selling single (outstripping The Beatles' largest seller ''She Loves You''). Although it would be topped in 1984 by Band Aid, ''Mull of Kintyre'' still ranks as the UK's fourth biggest selling single and the largest selling non-charity single.

After some final overdubbing in January 1978, London Town was completed and preceded by the US No. 1 ''With a Little Luck'' that March, while the album was released a week later. The album also features the song ''Girlfriend'' which was also recorded by American pop star Michael Jackson, who later featured it on his 1979 album Off the Wall. London Town generally fared well with the critics and in the charts, reaching No. 4 in the UK and No. 2 in the US where it sold over one million copies and went platinum. But after its strong start, it did not have the staying power of Wings' previous releases, with subsequent singles ''I've Had Enough'' and the title track becoming small hits. Although the advent of punk music (which sent the music industry into a period of change) would certainly have contributed to the slightly smaller sales of London Town, the album is now considered to mark the end of Wings' commercial peak and the beginning of a minor commercial slump for McCartney. On 14 May 1978, Paul and Linda McCartney were interviewed for BBC Radio's The Simon Bates Show to endorse the album and the single ''With a Little Luck''.

Paul McCartney was reportedly displeased with Capitol Records in the US, where ''Mull of Kintyre'' fared poorly (its B-Side, ''Girls School,'' did make a modest dent in the Top 40, reaching No. 33), and was further dismayed at what he viewed as lacklustre promotion for London Town. With his contract at an end, he signed up with Columbia Records for North America only (remaining with EMI worldwide) and would stay there until 1984, before returning to Capitol in the US.

In 1993, London Town was remastered and reissued on CD as part of ''The Paul McCartney Collection'' series with ''Mull of Kintyre'' and its B-side, ''Girls School'', as bonus tracks.

Wings band member Denny Laine recorded versions of ''Children Children'' and ''Deliver Your Children'' in 1996 on his album Wings at the Sound of Denny Laine. [wikipedia.org]


Paul McCartney / Wings - Back To The Egg (Columbia FC 36057) (1979)

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ITEM# SR-COFC36057
Ratings: C=VG+; LP=VG

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Artist:

Paul Mccartney / Wings

Title:

Back To The Egg

Released: 1979
Label: Columbia
Catalog: FC 36057
Genre: Rock
T R A C K L I S T:
01 Reception
02 Getting Closer
03 We're Open Tonight
04 Spin It On
05 Again And Again And Again
06 Old Siam, Sir
07 Arrow Through Me
08 Rockestra Theme
09 To You
10 After The Ball / Million Miles
11 Winter Rose / Love Awake
12 The Broadcast
13 So Glad To See You Here
14 Baby's Request
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Paul McCartney: Tug Of War (1982)

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ITEM# SR-COTC37462
Ratings: C=VG+; LP=NM-

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Artist:

Paul McCartney

Title:

Tug Of War

Released: 1982
Label: Columbia
Catalog: TC 37462
Genre: Rock
Note: Promo copy - stamped back cover
T R A C K L I S T:
01 Tug Of War
02 Take It Away
03 Somebody Who Cares
04 What's That You're Doing
05 Here Today
06 Ballroom Dancing
07 The Pound Is Sinking
08 Wanderlust
09 Get It
10 Be What You See
11 Dress Me Up As A Robber
12 Ebony And Ivory
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Album Review

by Stephen Thomas Erlewine [allmusic.com]

Reuniting with producer George Martin was a bit of a masterstroke on the part of Paul McCartney, since it guaranteed that Tug of War would receive a large, attentive audience. Martin does help McCartney focus, but it's hard to give all the credit to Tug of War, since McCartney was showing signs of creative rebirth on McCartney II, a homemade collection of synth-based tunes. This lush, ambitious, sprawling album couldn't be further from that record. That was deliberately experimental and intimate, while this is nothing less than a grand gesture, playing as McCartney's attempt to summarize everything he can do on one record. There's majestic balladry, folky guitars, unabashed whimsy, unashamed sentimentality, clever jokes, silliness, hints of reggae, a rockabilly duet with Carl Perkins, two collaborations with Stevie Wonder, and, of course, lots of great tunes. If anything, McCartney's trying a bit too hard here, and there are times that the music sags with its own ambition (or slightly dated production, as on the smash single "Ebony and Ivory"). But, at its best -- the surging title track, the giddy "Take It Away," the vaudevillian stomp "Ballroom Dancing," the Lennon tribute "Here Today," the wonderful "Wanderlust" -- it's as good as McCartney gets.


Paul McCartney - Pipes Of Peace [Columbia QC 39149] (1983)

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Artist:

Paul McCartney

Title:

Pipes Of Peace

Released: 1983
Label: Columbia
Catalog: QC 39149
Genre: Pop, Rock
T R A C K L I S T:
01 Pipes Of Peace
02 Say Say Say
03 The Other Me
04 Keep Under Cover
05 So Bad
06 The Man
07 Sweetest Little Show
08 Average Person
09 Hey Hey
10 Tug Of Peace
11 Through Our Love
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Album Review

Thomas Erlewine [allmusic.com]

Perhaps it isn't surprising that McCartney's grip on the pop charts started to slip with Pipes of Peace, since it was released after his 40th birthday -- and most rockers do not mature particularly gracefully. Although it's rather fascinating that the album didn't reach the Top Ten, despite a blockbuster duet with Michael Jackson in "Say Say Say," Pipes of Peace bewilders in other ways, particularly in its allusions to Tug of War. It often seems as if this album was constructed as a deliberate mirror image of its predecessor; it is also produced by George Martin, also contains two duets with an African-American superstar (Jackson here, Stevie Wonder there), also acknowledges an old bandmate (a Lennon tribute there, a Ringo cameo here), and even contains "Tug of Peace," a deliberate answer song to its predecessor. If only it were nearly as adventurous as Tug of War! Instead of dabbling in all his myriad musical personas, McCartney settles back into a soft rock groove, tempered somewhat by a desire to be contemporary (which means a heavy reliance on drum machines and synthesizers). Instead of sounding modern, McCartney winds up sounding like an aging rocker desperately trying to keep up with the time, but that in turn means that Pipes of Peace can often reveal what the early '80s were like for aging rockers -- he does embrace technology, but he winds up with immaculate productions that are decidedly of their time. Still, at its best, Pipes of Peace is ingratiating soft rock. In particular, the first side is close to irresistible, with the title track being a mid-tempo mini-epic, "Say Say Say" being fine pop-funk, "So Bad" being so sickly sweet that it's alluring, "The Man" being an effervescent Jackson duet, and "The Other Me" scoring with its square dance beats and winning McCartney vocal. Not enough to add up to a latter-day triumph from McCartney, but it still contains better songs than its blockbuster mid-'70s counterparts, and even if it's a little lightweight, it has more flair in its craft and more style in its sound than other McCartney albums, which is enough to make it a minor musical success, despite its disappointing chart performance.


Paul McCartney - Press [12''] [Capitol V-15235] (14 July 1986)

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Artist:

Paul McCartney

Title:

Press [12'']

Released: 14 July 1986
Label: Capitol
Catalog: V-15235
Genre: Pop Rock


T R A C K L I S T:
01 Press (Video Soundtrack)
02 It's Not True
03 Hanglide
04 Press (Dub Mix)
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Album Review

''Press'' is a song by Paul McCartney. It was released as the lead single from his sixth studio solo album, Press to Play, being McCartney's 37th single. The single features the non-album track, ''It's Not True'' as its B-side, which was later included as a bonus track on the CD reissue of the Press to Play album.

Though hitting the Top 30 in both the US (number 21, spending 8 weeks in the top 40) and the UK (#25), ''Press'' marked the beginning of a downturn of McCartney's fortunes on the singles charts, as it was the first time since Back to the Egg in 1979 that a lead single from a McCartney album failed to hit the Top 20 in the US/UK. This may have been because ''Press'' did not fit neatly into album-oriented rock or adult-contemporary radio formats popular at the time. [wikipedia.org]

Paul McCartney's Biography

by Stephen Thomas Erlewine [allmusic.com]

Out of all the former Beatles, Paul McCartney by far had the most successful solo career, maintaining a constant presence in the British and American charts during the '70s and '80s. In America alone, he had nine number one singles and seven number one albums during the first 12 years of his solo career. Although he sold records, McCartney never attained much critical respect, especially when compared to his former partner, John Lennon. Then again, he pursued a different path than Lennon, deciding early on that he wanted to be in a rock band. Little more than a year after the Beatles' breakup, McCartney had formed Wings with his wife, Linda, and the group remained active for the next ten years, racarole_king up a string of hit albums, singles, and tours in the meantime. By the late '70s, many critics were taking potshots at McCartney's effortlessly melodic songcraft, but that didn't stop the public from buying his records. His sales didn't slow considerably until the late '80s, and he retaliated with his first full-scale tour since the '70s, which was a considerable success. During the '90s, McCartney recorded less frequently, concentrating on projects like his first classical recording, a techno album, and the Beatles' Anthology series. The 21st century saw a creative renewal, including studio albums with a variety of stylistic detours, from straight-ahead rock & roll to standards and more classical projects.

Like Lennon and George Harrison, McCartney began exploring creative avenues outside the Beatles during the late '60s, but where his bandmates released their own experimental records, McCartney confined himself to writing and production for other artists, with the exception of his 1966 soundtrack to The Family Way. Following his marriage to Linda Eastman on March 12, 1969, McCartney began working at his home studio on his first solo album. He released the record, McCartney, in April 1970, two weeks before the Beatles' Let It Be was scheduled to hit the stores. Prior to the album's release, he announced that the Beatles were breaking up, which was against the wishes of the other members. As a result, the tensions between him and the other three members, particularly Harrison and Lennon, increased and he earned the ill will of many critics. Nevertheless, McCartney became a hit, spending three weeks at the top of the American charts. Early in 1971, he returned with "Another Day," which became his first hit single as a solo artist. It was followed several months later by Ram, another homemade collection, this time featuring the contributions of his wife, Linda.

By the end of 1971, the McCartneys had formed Wings, which was intended to be a full-fledged recording and touring band. Former Moody Blues guitarist Denny Laine and drummer Denny Seiwell became the group's other members, and Wings released their first album, Wild Life, in December 1971. Wild Life was greeted with poor reviews and was a relative flop. McCartney and Wings, which now featured former Grease Band guitarist Henry McCullough, spent 1972 as a working band, releasing three singles -- the protest "Give Ireland Back to the Irish," the reggae-fied "Mary Had a Little Lamb," and the rocarole_king "Hi Hi Hi." Red Rose Speedway followed in the spring of 1973, and while it received weak reviews, it became his second American number one album. Later in 1973, Wings embarked on their first British tour, at the conclusion of which McCullough and Seiwell left the band. Prior to their departure, McCartney's theme to the James Bond movie Live and Let Die became a Top Ten hit in the U.S. and U.K. That summer, the remaining Wings proceeded to record a new album in Nigeria. Released late in 1973, Band on the Run was simultaneously McCartney's best-reviewed album and his most successful, spending four weeks at the top of the U.S. charts and eventually going triple platinum.

Following the success of Band on the Run, McCartney formed a new version of Wings with guitarist Jimmy McCulloch and drummer Geoff Britton. The new lineup was showcased on the 1974 British single "Junior's Farm" and the 1975 hit album Venus and Mars. At the Speed of Sound followed in 1976, and it was the first Wings record to feature songwriting contributions by the other bandmembers. Nevertheless, the album became a monster success on the basis of two McCartney songs, "Silly Love Songs" and "Let 'Em In." Wings supported the album with their first international tour, which broke many attendance records and was captured on the live triple album Wings Over America (1976). After the tour was completed, Wings rested a bit during 1977, as McCartney released an instrumental version of Ram under the name Thrillington and produced Denny Laine's solo album Holly Days. Later that year, Wings released "Mull of Kintyre," which became the biggest-selling British single of all time, selling over two million copies. Wings followed "Mull of Kintyre" with London Town in 1978, which became another platinum record. After its release, McCulloch left the band to join the re-formed Small Faces and Wings released Back to the Egg in 1979. Though the record went platinum, it failed to produce any big hits. Early in 1980, McCartney was arrested for marijuana possession at the beginning of a Japanese tour; he was imprisoned for ten days and then released, without any charges being pressed.

Wings effectively broke up in the wake of McCartney's Japanese bust, although its official dissolution was not announced until April 27, 1981, when Denny Laine left the band. Back in England, McCartney recorded McCartney II, which was a one-man band effort like his solo debut. Ironically, the hit single associated with the album was a live take of the song "Coming Up" that had been recorded in Glasgow with Wings in December 1979 and was intended to be the B-side of the 45, with the solo studio recording as the A-side. DJs preferred the live version, however, and it went on to hit number one. Later in 1980, McCartney entered the studio with Beatles' producer George Martin to make Tug of War.

Released in the spring of 1982, Tug of War received the best reviews of any McCartney record since Band on the Run and spawned the number one single with "Ebony and Ivory," a duet with Stevie Wonder that became McCartney's biggest American hit. In 1983, McCartney sang on "The Girl Is Mine," the first single from Michael Jackson's blockbuster album Thriller. In return, Jackson dueted with McCartney on "Say Say Say," the first single from McCartney's 1983 album Pipes of Peace and the last number one single of his career. The relationship between Jackson and McCartney soured considerably when Jackson bought the publishing rights to the Beatles' songs from underneath McCartney in 1985.

McCartney directed his first feature film in 1984 with Give My Regards to Broad Street. While the soundtrack, which featured new songs and re-recorded Beatles tunes, was a hit, generating the hit single "No More Lonely Nights," the film was a flop, earning terrible reviews. The following year, he had his last American Top Ten with the theme to the Chevy Chase/Dan Aykroyd comedy Spies Like Us. Press to Play (1986) received some strong reviews but the album was a flop. In 1988, he recorded a collection of rock & roll oldies called Choba B CCCP for release in the U.S.S.R.; it was given official release in the U.S. and U.K. in 1991. For 1989's Flowers in the Dirt, McCartney co-wrote several songs with Elvis Costello; the pair also wrote songs for Costello's Spike, including the hit "Veronica." Flowers in the Dirt received the strongest reviews of any McCartney release since Tug of War, and was supported by an extensive international tour, which was captured on the live double album Tripping the Live Fantastic (1990). For the tour, McCartney hired guitarist Robbie McIntosh and bassist Hamish Stuart, who would form the core of his band through the remainder of the '90s.

Early in 1991, McCartney released another live album in the form of Unplugged, which was taken from his appearance on MTV's acoustic concert program of the same name; it was the first Unplugged album to be released. Later that year, he unveiled Liverpool Oratorio, his first classical work. Another pop album, Off the Ground, followed in 1993, but the album failed to generate any big hits, despite McCartney's successful supporting tour. Following the completion of the New World tour, he released another live album, Paul Is Live, in December 1993. In 1994, he released an ambient techno album under the pseudonym the Fireman. McCartney premiered his second classical piece, The Leaf, early in 1995 and then began hosting a Westwood One radio series called Oobu Joobu. But his primary activity in 1995, as well as 1996, was the Beatles' Anthology, which encompassed a lengthy video documentary of the band and the multi-volume release of Beatles' outtakes and rarities. After Anthology was completed, he released Flaming Pie in summer 1997. A low-key, largely acoustic affair that had the some of the same charm of his debut, Flaming Pie was given the strongest reviews McCartney had received in years and was a modest commercial success, debuting at number two on the U.S. and U.K. charts; it was his highest American chart placing since he left the Beatles. Flaming Pie certainly benefited from the success of Anthology, as did McCartney himself -- only a few months before the release of the album in 1997, he received a Knighthood.

On April 17, 1998, Linda McCartney died after a three-year struggle with breast cancer. A grieving Paul kept a low profile in the months to follow, but finally returned in fall 1999 with Run Devil Run, a collection primarily including cover songs. The electronica-based Liverpool Sound Collage followed a year later, and the pop album Driving Rain -- a successor, of sorts, to Flaming Pie -- came a year after that. The live album Back in the U.S. appeared in America in 2002 with the slightly different international edition, Back in the World, following soon after. McCartney's next studio project included sessions with super-producer Nigel Godrich, the results of which appeared on the mellow Chaos and Creation in the Back Yard, released in late 2005. McCartney performed every instrument (not including the strings) on 2007's David Kahne-produced Memory Almost Full, a bold but whimsical collection of new songs, some of which were recorded before the Chaos and Creation in the Back Yard sessions. A live CD/DVD set, Good Evening New York City, appeared in 2009. The following year, McCartney kicked off an extensive reissue campaign with a box set of Band on the Run, and he supported the reissue with an American tour in the summer of 2011. That fall, McCartney released his first ballet, Ocean's Kingdom, and a collection of pre-WWII standards called Kisses on the Bottom in February of 2012.
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