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The Flock

Read The Flock's biography



The Flock - The Flock [Columbia CS 9911] (1969)

LP to Digital [FLAC] transfer bundle $39.99
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ITEM# SR-COCS9911
Ratings: C=VG-; LP=VG

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Artist:

The Flock

Title:

The Flock

Released: 1969
Label: Columbia
Catalog: CS 9911
Genre: Jazz, Rock, Fusion
This is an original US press, Columbia 360 Sound.
Terre Haute pressing.
Very small corner notch cut out.
Includes Lyric Sheet Insert


Matrix / Runout (Side A):
o XXSM150677-2AB 2 T

Matrix / Runout (Side B):
o XXSM150678-2K 2 T
T R A C K L I S T:
01 Introduction
02 Clown
03 I Am The Tall Tree
04 Tired Of Waiting
05 Store Bought - Store Thought
06 Truth
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Album Review

Mark Allan [allmusic.com]

The first thing you hear is an electric guitar, but listeners are quickly exposed to the band's secret weapon -- the violin of Jerry Goodman. The instrumental opening track lays out the group's bold fusion of classical and rock. Subsequent tracks, including the Ray Davies chestnut ''Tired of Waiting,'' add jazz to the mix with an unconventional horn section of two tenor saxes and a trumpet. Veteran English bluesman John Mayall raves about the Chicago septet in the liner notes. Like the Blind Faith album, this powerful debut is undercut by a too-long jam at the end.


The Flock - Inside Out (Mercury SRM-1-1035) (1975)

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LP to Digital [FLAC] transfer bundle $39.99
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ITEM# SR-SRM11035
Ratings: C=G; LP=VG

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Artist:

The Flock

Title:

Inside Out

Released: 1975
Label: Mercury
Catalog: SRM-1-1035
Genre: Rock / Progressive Rock
NOTE: corner cut-out on cover
T R A C K L I S T:
01 Music For Our Friends
02 Back To You
03 Metamorphosis
04 Hang On
05 My OK Today
06 Straight Home
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The Flock's Biography

by Eduardo Rivadavia [allmusic.com]

Forming in late-'60s Chicago, the Flock forever languished in the shadow of the Chicago Transit Authority (later famous as just plain Chicago), whose peculiar approach to art rock -- incorporating horns and other unorthodox instrumentation into rock and jazz forms -- they also pursued. But though they clearly lacked Chicago's smash-hit-penning abilities, the Flock possessed a secret weapon in masterful violinist Jerry Goodman, and their genre-smashing compositions were often even more extreme, if not exactly Top 40 material.

Rick Canoff (vocals, saxophone) and Fred Glickstein (vocals, guitar, organ) were already performing in a garage band called the Exclusives in 1965 when they decided to rename themselves the Flock. The duo recorded a number of independent singles with various backing musicians over the next few years, but it wasn't until they discovered that their guitar tech, one Jerry Goodman, also happened to be a virtuoso violinist and invited him into the fold that the Flock's sound truly began to take shape. By 1969, the septet was completed by Jerry Smith (bass), Ron Karpman (drums), John Gerber (sax, flute, banjo), and Tom Webb (sax, flute), and had scored a deal with Columbia Records, for whom they recorded their groundbreaking eponymous debut that same year. But, not even enthusiastic endorsements from some of the era's most respected musicians (including English blues legend John Mayall, who famously dubbed them the "best American band" he'd heard and wrote the album's liner notes) could help sell the Flock's complicated music, which simply proved too unusual and inaccessible for most consumers. The band continued to plug along on the live circuit, including a stint at the prestigious 1970 Bath Festival (where they performed before a then-skyrocketing Led Zeppelin), but their label, Columbia, was already beginning to lose faith. Complicating matters further, 1971's Dinosaur Swamps proved a disappointing second effort, falling well short of its predecessor's inspirational flights; it is perhaps best-remembered for its beautiful cover artwork, rather than the songs contained within. A third LP, reportedly to be called "Flock Rock," was summarily shelved uncompleted, and the Flock had fallen apart by 1972. Violinist Goodman later worked with the Mahavishnu Orchestra and Dixie Dregs, among others, but except for a brief, disastrous reunion which yielded 1975's ill-received Inside Out album, the remaining members of the Flock soon faded into rock & roll obscurity.
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