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Blood, Sweat & Tears

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Blood, Sweat & Tears - Blood, Sweat & Tears [Columbia CS 9720] (1969)

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Artist:

Blood, Sweat & Tears

Title:

Blood, Sweat & Tears

Released: 1969
Label: Columbia
Catalog: CS 9720
Genre: Rock / Pop
T R A C K L I S T:
01 Variations On A Theme By Eric Satie (1st And 2nd Movements)
02 Smiling Phases
03 Sometimes In Winter
04 More And More
05 And When I Die
06 God Bless The Child
07 Spinning Wheel
08 You've Made Me So Very Happy
09 Blues--Part II
10 Variations On A Theme By Eric Satie (1st Movement)
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Album Reveiw

by Rovi [allmusic.com]

This was Blood, Sweat & Tears' apex, and a testimony to the best of the jazz/rock movement. Created by the legendary Al Kooper, the band was one of the major movers in the late-1960s rock scene. Though Kooper had departed after the debut album, this follow-up is bold, brassy, and adventurous, and the arrival of David Clayton-Thomas gave the band a strong singer and focal point. Eclecticism abounds, as an interpretation of an Eric Satie composition is followed by a version of Traffic's ''Smiling Phases.'' Hit singles galore were culled from this record--''Spinning Wheel,'' ''You've Made Me So Very Happy,'' and ''And When I Die,''--not to mention a superb rendition of Billie Holiday's ''God Bless The Child.''


Blood, Sweat & Tears: Blood, Sweat & Tears 3 (1970)

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Artist:

Blood, Sweat & Tears

Title:

Blood, Sweat & Tears 3

Released: 1970
Label: Columbia
Catalog: KC 30090
Genre: Rock / Pop
T R A C K L I S T:
01 Hi-De-Ho
02 The Battle
03 Lucretia Macevil
04 Lucretia's Reprise
05 Fire And Rain
06 Lonesome Suzie
07 Symphony For The Devil/Sympathy For The Devil
08 He's A Runner
09 Somethin' Comin' On
10 40,000 Headmen
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Album Reveiw

by William Ruhlmann [allmusic.com]

Blood, Sweat & Tears had a hard act to follow in recording their third album. Nevertheless, BS&T constructed a convincing, if not quite as impressive, companion to their previous hit. David Clayton-Thomas remained an enthusiastic blues shouter, and the band still managed to put together lively arrangements, especially on the Top 40 hits "Hi-De-Ho" and "Lucretia Mac Evil." Elsewhere, they re-created the previous album's jazzing up of Laura Nyro ("He's a Runner") and Traffic ("40,000 Headmen"), although their pretentiousness, on the extended "Symphony/Sympathy for the Devil," and their tendency to borrow other artists' better-known material (James Taylor's "Fire and Rain") rather than generating more of their own, were warning signs for the future. In the meantime, BS&T 3 was another chart-topping gold hit.


Blood, Sweat And Tears - B,S&T-4 (Import England) (CBS 64355) (1971)

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Artist:

Blood, Sweat & Tears

Title:

B,S&T:4

Released: 1971
Label: CBS
Catalog: 64355
Genre: Rock / Pop
Note: Made In England (Import)
T R A C K L I S T:
01 Go Down Gamblin'
02 Cowboys And Indians
03 John The Baptist (Holy John)
04 Redempton
05 Lisa, Listen To Me
06 A Look To My Heart
07 High On A Mountain
08 Valentine's Day
09 Take Me In Your Arms
(Rock Me A Little While)
10 For My Lady
11 Mama Gets High
12 A Look To My Heart (Duet)
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Album Reveiw

by William Ruhlmann [allmusic.com]

Having relied largely on outside songwriting for its last two wildly successful albums, Blood, Sweat & Tears decided (as many groups had before) to bring some of that song publishing income into the family by writing their own material. Singer David Clayton-Thomas contributed the Top 40 hit "Go Down Gamblin'," and he and keyboard player Dick Halligan collaborated on another chart entry, "Lisa, Listen to Me." Ex-bandleader Al Kooper even contributed a track, "John the Baptist (Holy John)." But Side two was given over largely to songs by guitarist Steve Katz that were substandard, and the band's cohesion seemed to be disintegrating. Although the album scraped the Top Ten briefly and went gold, it marked the end of BS&T's period of wide commercial success on records. By the next outing, Clayton-Thomas had quit and the band's heyday was behind it.


Blood, Sweat & Tears - New Blood [Columbia KC 31780] (1972)

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Artist:

Blood, Sweat & Tears

Title:

New Blood

Released: 1972
Label: Columbia
Catalog: KC 31780
Genre: Jazz Rock
Note: Includes lyric insert


T R A C K L I S T:
01-Down In The Flood
02-Touch Me
03-Alone
04-Velvet
05-I Can't Move No Mountains
06-Over The Hill
07-So Long Dixie
08-Snow Queen
09-Maiden Voyage
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Blood, Sweat & Tears - Mirror Image [Columbia KC 32929] (July 1974)

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Artist:

Blood, Sweat & Tears

Title:

Mirror Image

Released: July 1974
Label: Columbia
Catalog: KC 32929
Genre: Jazz, Rock, Funk / Soul, Blues


T R A C K L I S T:
01 Tell Me That I'm Wrong
02 Look Up To The Sky
03 Love Looks Good On You (You're Candy Sweet)
04 Hold On To Me
05 Thinking Of You
06 Are You Satisfied

Mirror Image

07 Movement I Maglomania
08 Movement II Mirror Image
09 Movement III South Mountain Shuffle (Inspiration From Chick)
10 Movement IV Rock Reprise
11 She's Coming Home
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Album Review

Mirror Image is an album by the band Blood, Sweat & Tears, released in 1974.

Founding member Jim Fielder left the band prior to the recording of Mirror Image, leaving drummer Bobby Colomby as the only remaining original member. Long-time horn player Lew Soloff also left the group. Jerry LaCroix, previously of Edgar Winter's band White Trash joined on saxophone and occasional lead vocals. This album was produced by veteran Motown producer Henry Cosby, best known for his work on early Stevie Wonder songs. [wikipedia.org]


Blood, Sweat & Tears - More Than Ever [Columbia PC 34233] (1976)

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ITEM# SR-COPC34233
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Artist:

Blood, Sweat & Tears

Title:

More Than Ever

Released: 1976
Label: Columbia
Catalog: PC 34233
Genre: Jazz, Rock


T R A C K L I S T:
01 They
02 I Love You More Than Ever
03 Katy Bell
04 Sweet Sadie The Savior
05 Hollywood
06 You're The One
07 Heavy Blue
08 Saved By The Grace Of Your Love
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Album Review

More Than Ever is an album by the band Blood, Sweat & Tears, released in July 1976. This was the band's ninth studio album and their last for Columbia Records. This album peaked at Number 165 on the Billboard album charts.

The personnel changes in the band continued with Mike Stern replacing Georg Wadenius on electric guitar, Danny Trifan replacing Ron McClure on bass, and Forest Buchtell replacing Joe Giorgianni on trumpet. Percussionist Don Alias left the band, and Mike Corbett was added on background vocals. Famed bassist Jaco Pastorius, who had been discovered and signed to Epic Records by Bobby Colomby, was briefly in the band around this time but did not appear on the album.

More Than Ever was produced by Bob James who brought in such legendary session players as Steve Khan on guitar, Richard Tee on keyboards, Eric Gale on guitar, Hugh McCracken on guitar, and Eric Weissberg on banjo and dobro along with vocalist Patti Austin on background vocals to complement the regular BS&T lineup.

The album had an unusual cover design, simply presenting a photo of the vinyl record itself. [wikipedia.org]


Blood, Sweat & Tears - Brand New Day [ABC Records AB-1015] (1977)

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Artist:

Blood, Sweat & Tears

Title:

Brand New Day

Released: 1977
Label: ABC Records
Catalog: AB-1015
Genre: Rock / Jazz
T R A C K L I S T:
01 Somebody I Trusted (Put Out The Light)
02 Dreaming As One
03 Same Old Blues
04 Lady Put Out The Light
05 Womanizer
06 Blue Street
07 Gimme That Wine
08 Rock & Roll Queen
09 Don't Explain
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Album Review

Jason Elias [allmusic.com]

Despite the fact that the band was one of the more influential outfits of the late '60s and early '70s, a few key departures caused them to recede from the charts before a few of their peers. Even the return of vocalist David Clayton-Thomas couldn't help the fortunes of their last two '70s albums, and they were released in 1976. Brand New Day is their first and only effort for soon defunct ABC. Brand New Day is produced by Roy Halee and group member Bobby Colomby. The two had been co-producers for 1971's classic Blood Sweat and Tears 4, but, by 1977, the musical landscape had changed, so this is closer to R&B and polished pop, rather than the amalgam of styles that the group was famous for. "Dreaming As One" is a duet between Clayton-Thomas and Chaka Khan and despite the interesting chemistry, the song is barely there. Both "Same Old Blues" and the humorous "Gimme That Wine" have the band incorporating a funkier sound by way of elastic bass patterns and Clayton-Thomas's playful vocals. The well-intentioned tribute to Janis Joplin, "Rock and Roll Queen," comes off a little heavy handed. This does end strong, however. The cover of Billie Holiday's "Don't Explain" has a graceful arrangement and a subdued and effective vocal from Thomas. For the most part, Brand New Day wasn't as innovative or as grand as previous releases, but fans will enjoy some of the better moments.

Blood, Sweat & Tears' Biography

by Bruce Eder [allmusic.com]

No American rock group ever started with as much daring or musical promise as Blood, Sweat & Tears, or realized their potential more fully -- and then blew it all as quickly. From their origins as a jazz-rock experiment that wowed critics and listeners, they went on -- in a somewhat more pop vein -- to sell almost six million records in three years, but ended up being dropped by their record label four years after that. Blood, Sweat & Tears started as an idea conceived by Al Kooper in July of 1967. An ex-member of the Blues Project, Kooper had been toying with the notion, growing out of his admiration for jazz bandleader Maynard Ferguson, of forming an electric rock band that would include horns and use jazz as the basis for their work. He planned to pursue this in London, but a series of New York shows involving some big-name friends didn't raise enough money to get him there. He did, however, find three players who wanted to work with him: bassist Jim Fielder, Blues Project guitarist Steve Katz, and drummer Bobby Colomby. Kooper agreed, as long as he was in charge musically. The horn section featured Fred Lipsius (saxophone), with Randy Brecker and Jerry Weiss on trumpets and flügelhorns, and Dick Halligan playing trombone. The new group was signed to Columbia Records, and the name "Blood, Sweat & Tears" came to Kooper after a jam at the Cafe au Go Go, where a cut on his hand left his organ keyboard covered in blood.

That first version of Blood, Sweat & Tears played music that roamed freely through realms of jazz, R&B, soul, and even psychedelia in ways that had scarcely been heard before in one band. The songs were bold and challenging, and the arrangements gave Lipsius, Brecker, et. al room to solo, while Kooper's organ and Katz's guitar swelled in pulsing, shimmering glory. Their debut, Child Is Father to the Man, was released in February 1968, and seemed to portend a great future. The only thing it didn't have was a hit single to get AM radio play and help drive sales.

Disagreements about repertory grew into doubts about Kooper's ability as a lead singer, and soon split this band. Kooper left in March of 1968, and Brecker followed him out. That might've been the end of the story, except that Colomby and Katz decided to salvage a band of their own band out of this debacle. The lineup was reshuffled and expanded, and for a lead singer they found a Canadian national named David Clayton-Thomas.

The new Blood, Sweat & Tears recorded their album in late 1968. Blood, Sweat & Tears, released in January 1969, was smoother and more traditionally melodic than its predecessor. Equally important, the singles from the album were edited, removing the featured spots for the jazz players. "You've Made Me So Very Happy" rose to number two and lofted the album to the top of the LP listings. "Spinning Wheel" b/w "More and More" and "And When I Die" followed, and when the smoke cleared, the album had yielded a career's worth of hits. The LP also won the Grammy as Album of the Year, selling three million copies in the bargain.

In the spring of 1970, however, the group lost a huge amount of momentum with its core audience, college students, when they undertook a tour of Eastern Europe on behalf of the U.S. State Department. The Vietnam War was still raging, and anything to do with the government was potentially poisonous on college campuses. It was on their return to America, amid this dubious career move -- which was done to overcome the problem of Clayton-Thomas' shaky immigration status -- that Blood, Sweat & Tears 3 was released. It briefly topped the LP charts, and the single "Hi-De-Ho" reached number 14, but both sold only a fraction of what their earlier releases had done. Additionally, the group was now criticized in the rock press, which felt that Blood, Sweat & Tears were either a pretentious pop group that dabbled in horn riffs, or a jazz outfit trying to pass as a rock band. The group's decision to perform at a Las Vegas casino -- which even upset the head of Columbia Records, Clive Davis -- did nothing to defuse these doubts.

Clayton-Thomas exited after the fourth album to pursue a solo career. Most of the group's original and second-generation players were gone by then as well, though the playing standard remained consistently high. The lineup became a revolving door -- even Jaco Pastorius passed through their ranks, briefly -- and the group's record sales imploded, squeezed as they were by Chicago on the pop side of jazz-rock, and outfits such as Weather Report and Return to Forever on the more musically ambitious side of the spectrum. Clayton-Thomas returned in 1974, to what was billed officially as "Blood, Sweat & Tears Featuring David Clayton-Thomas." They released New City (1975), which did well enough to justify an ambitious tour that yielded the double-LP Live and Improvised. Columbia Records dropped the group in 1976, and even Bobby Colomby, who had trademarked the group's name, gave up playing with them. Clayton-Thomas has kept the group name alive in the decades since, fronting various lineups.
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