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The Art Of Noise

Read The Art Of Noise's biography



The Art Of Noise - In Visible Silence [Chrysalis BFV 41528] (14 April 1986)

LP to Digital [FLAC] transfer bundle $39.99
plus shipping

ITEM# SR-CHBFV41528
Ratings:C=VG-; LP=VG+

Please allow two to three weeks for delivery.

Artist:

The Art Of Noise

Title:

In Visible Silence

Released: 14 April 1986
Label: Chrysalis
Catalog: BFV 41528
Pressing: Pitman
Genre: Electronic, Synth-Pop


Matrix / Runout (Side A):
STERLING TJ P(AP) [SCRATCHED OUT ''B'']FV 41528 AS CP2

Matrix / Runout (Side B):
STERLING P (AP) [SCRATCHED OUT ''B'']FV 41528 BS P7
T R A C K L I S T:
01 Opus 4
02 Paranoimia
03 Eye Of A Needle
04 Legs
05 Slip Of The Tongue
06 Backbeat
07 Instruments Of Darkness
08 Peter Gunn
09 Camilla-The Old, Old Story
10 The Chameleon's Dish
11 Beatback
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Album Review

Steven McDonald [allmusic.com]

AON hit their stride with the release of this record, while showing their colors in the choices of material -- while the usual offbeat AON elements were present, so was ''Peter Gunn,'' with Duane Eddy guesting on guitar. Another AON hit, ''Legs,'' was present, as was the original version of ''Paranoimia,'' enhanced in its single versions by the addition of routines from Max Headroom performed by Matt Frewer, who would later play the digital ding-a-ling on a short-lived TV series. The Frewer versions replaced the original on some pressings, including the original CD, but the original version has since been restored, with both Frewer versions now confined to best-of collections.


The Art Of Noise - In No Sense? Nonsense! [Chrysalis OV 41570] (28 September 1987)

LP to Digital [FLAC] transfer bundle $39.99
plus shipping

ITEM# SR-CHOV41570
Ratings: C=VG+; LP=VG+

Please allow two to three weeks for delivery.

Artist:

The Art Of Noise

Title:

In No Sense? Nonsense!

Released: 28 September 1987
Label: Chrysalis
Catalog: OV 41570
Genre: Electronic, Synth Pop


Matrix / Runout (Side A):
OV 41570 AS DMM C1 G2 STERLING E5

Matrix / Runout (Side B):
OV 41570 BS DMM C1 G1 STERLING A7
T R A C K L I S T:
01 Galleons Of Stone
02 Dragnet
03 Fin Du Temps
04 How Rapid?
05 Opus For Four
06 Debut
07 E.F.L.
08 Ode To Don Jose
09 A Day At The Races
10 Counterpoint
11 Roundabout 727
12 Ransom On The Sand
13 Roller 1
14 Nothing Was Going To Stop Them Then, Anyway
15 Crusoe
16 One Earth
Submit a review.

Album Review

Evan Cater [allmusic.com]

In No Sense? Nonsense! contains some of the Art of Noise's most compelling work. With this album, Anne Dudley and company expanded their new wave experiments to include more instrumental firepower. In addition to full rock band production (including electric guitars, drums, and synthesizers), this record makes use of brass band, orchestral, and choral music. The result is about as rich and complex as they ever got. In No Sense? Nonsense! is probably best known as the album that included their take on the theme from the '50s cop show Dragnet, used in the 1987 film version that starred Dan Akroyd and Tom Hanks. That track is certainly the most accessible on the record, but it somehow seems a little too punchy for the primary ambient pop surroundings. It might fit better on a different album. This record is more notable for tracks like ''How Rapid?'' and ''Opus for Four'' that engage in fanciful genre blending. At times, the sound almost begins to anticipate later ambient dance artists like Enigma and DJ Shadow. But the Art of Noise are aptly named and consequently limited. Their artful noise collage lacks the visceral impact afforded by those later bands. In No Sense? is more often interesting than beautiful.

The Art Of Noise's Biography

Stephen Thomas Erlewine [allmusic.com]

Anne Dudley, Gary Langan, and Paul Morley were members of producer Trevor Horn's in-house studio band in the early '80s before they formed the Art of Noise, a techno-pop group whose music was an amalgam of studio gimmickry, tape splicing, and synthesized beats. The Art of Noise took material from a variety of sources: hip-hop, rock, jazz, R&B, traditional pop, found sounds, and noise all worked their way into the group's distinctly postmodern soundscapes.

Dudley was the center of the group, having arranged and produced material for Frankie Goes to Hollywood, ABC, and Paul McCartney before forming the Art of Noise. The trio signed with Trevor Horn's ZTT label, releasing their first EP, Into Battle With the Art of Noise, in 1983. The following year, the group released the full-length (Who's Afraid Of?) The Art of Noise!, which featured the hit single ''Close (To the Edit).''

After ''Close (To the Edit),'' the group parted ways with Horn and ZTT, releasing In Visible Silence in 1986; the album included the U.K. Top Ten hit ''Peter Gunn,'' which featured Duane Eddy on guitar. Re-works of the Art of Noise, an album of remixes and live tracks, was released that same year. In No Sense? Nonsense!, released in 1987, saw the band experimenting with orchestras and choirs, as well as horns and rock bands. The next year, the Art of Noise released a greatest-hits collection, The Best of the Art of Noise, which featured their collaboration with Tom Jones on Prince's ''Kiss.''

Below the Waste (1990) captured the band experimenting with world music; it received a lukewarm critical and commercial reception. The following year, a low-key remix album directed by Killing Joke's Youth called The Ambient Collection appeared. Later in the year, the Art of Noise broke up. Dudley eventually worked with Killing Joke's Jaz Coleman and Phil Collins. Horn, Dudley, and Morley reunited in 1999 for a new album, The Seduction of Claude Debussy. Kevin Godley and Lol Creme were added to the lineup.
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